ARM Blog

Watch Where You are Going

What do you think?  You’re driving along the road on your way north, when out of nowhere comes this car going at a speed much higher than the speed limit.  The driver is zigzagging through the traffic and several other drivers are hitting their brakes so there won’t be an accident.  Horns are honking, tires are peeling and people are jostled. The driver didn’t seem to understand the problems he/she is causing for other drivers.  It takes your breath away for a moment, and then you focus again on your own driving.  How do we deal with this situation within ourselves?

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Does anything like this happen in the church?  Well, maybe not with a car, but I have seen people bumping into others without noticing how they are affecting others.  I have seen people who are “doing the bumping” catch themselves and apologize for whatever happened.  I have also seen those people who don’t know (maybe even don’t care) who they “bumped into.”  They were on a mission and they were going to complete it.  This doesn’t seem so wrong, until you get “bumped.”  The words in Philippians 2:3-4 comes to mind in how we deal with such a situation: “Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit, but in humility consider others better than yourselves.  Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also the interests of others.”

How do we deal with this kind of situation?  We respond with love and forgiveness.  When we get “bumped,” it doesn’t always mean that someone else is at fault.  Sometimes, it does, but we have to remember that no one is perfect.  They may have “bumped” you because they were in a hurry.  You may have been “bumped” because you got in the way of what was happening.  If the person apologizes, we must be quick to forgive.  It may be that we need to apologize for getting in the way.  Whatever the situation, handle it with prayer and care.  We have to be the witnesses God wants us to be.  Who may be watching how we respond or react?   How does our response affect the other person?  We might remind ourselves of a time when we did the “bumping.”  How did we handle that situation?

Looking out for others is a good trait for people to possess.  We can be those people who respond in love and forgive.

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